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<em>Hamlet</em><br>by William Shakespeare
2015-16 UMS Films
Hamlet
by William Shakespeare
Sun 7/10/16 7:00PM Michigan Theater


The TEAM: <i>RoosevElvis</i>
2016-17 UMS
The TEAM: RoosevElvis

If you could swap identities, would you rather be the 26th President of the United States or the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll? It’s a question The TEAM asks in RoosevElvis. On a hallucinatory road trip from the Badlands to Graceland, the spirits of Elvis Presley and Theodore Roosevelt battle over the soul of Ann, a painfully shy meat-processing plant worker, and what kind of man — or woman — Ann should become. Set against the boundless blue skies of the Great Plains and endless American highway, RoosevElvis is a playfully pointed new work about icons, gender, and nobodies and somebodies all blended into “a spirited and insightful commentary on two archetypes of American masculinity.” (New York Times) Once described as “Gertrude Stein meets MTV,” The TEAM’s work crashes American history and mythology into modern stories that illuminate our time.


Kamasi Washington &<br />The Next Step
2016-17 UMS
Kamasi Washington &
The Next Step
"The 35-year-old tenor saxophonist Kamasi Washington has emerged as the most-talked-about jazz musician since Wynton Marsalis arrived on the New York scene three decades ago." (New York Times)

Born into a musical family, he recently collaborated and appeared on rapper Kendrick Lamar's platinum album To Pimp a Butterfly and has also performed with the likes of Snoop Dogg, Gerald Wilson, Mos Def, Quincy Jones, and Chaka Khan. But while Washington and the other members of his coalition of musicians turned to hip-hop and R&B to make a living, they've been immersed in jazz since they were teenagers in South Central L.A. Washington recently released a groundbreaking solo album, The Epic, a 172-minute, triple-disc masterpiece, which was awarded the inaugural American Music Prize recognizing the best debut album of the previous year across all genres. "The Los Angeles saxophonist is the most audacious player in a movement making the electric flurry of 1970s fusion jazz cool again." (Rolling Stone)

Beethoven Quartet Cycle<br />
Tak&aacute;cs Quartet<br />
Concert 1
2016-17 UMS
Beethoven Quartet Cycle
Takács Quartet
Concert 1

“They are not for you, but for a later age!” So wrote Ludwig van Beethoven about his Op. 59 quartets, which will be performed in Ann Arbor this season as part of a complete Beethoven string quartet cycle by the Takács Quartet over six concerts in the 2016-17 season, joining only two other ensembles (the Budapest and Guarneri Quartets) to complete the cycle in a single season. Composed against the turbulent backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars and their aftermath, this radical music is as invigorating now as it was for its first performers and audiences. The first two and last two concerts are included in the 54th Chamber Arts Series; the middle two concerts are available as a subscriber add-on.

PROGRAM CONCERT 1

  • Quartet No. 2 in G Major, Op. 18, No. 2
  • Quartet No. 11 in f minor, Op. 95 (“Serioso”)
  • Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 with finale

Beethoven Quartet Cycle<br/>
Tak&aacute;cs Quartet<br/>
Concert 2
2016-17 UMS
Beethoven Quartet Cycle
Takács Quartet
Concert 2

“They are not for you, but for a later age!” So wrote Ludwig van Beethoven about his Op. 59 quartets, which will be performed in Ann Arbor this season as part of a complete Beethoven string quartet cycle by the Takács Quartet over six concerts in the 2016-17 season, joining only two other ensembles (the Budapest and Guarneri Quartets) to complete the cycle in a single season. Composed against the turbulent backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars and their aftermath, this radical music is as invigorating now as it was for its first performers and audiences. The first two and last two concerts are included in the 54th Chamber Arts Series; the middle two concerts are available as a subscriber add-on.

PROGRAM CONCERT 2

  • Quartet No. 1 in F Major, Op. 18, No. 1
  • Quartet No. 10 in E-flat Major, Op. 74 (“Harp”)
  • Quartet No. 14 in c-sharp minor, Op. 131

Mark Morris Dance Group<br><i>Layla and Majnun</i>
2016-17 UMS
Mark Morris Dance Group
Layla and Majnun

Mark Morris returns with his company of 15 dancers for a new, large-scale production that receives its world premiere in September. Layla and Majnun is an Arabian love story that originated as a poem in ancient Persia and is well known among many Middle Eastern and sub-continental cultures. In love from childhood, Layla and Majnun (the name means "possessed") are not allowed to unite. Majnun, mad in his obsession with Layla, becomes a hermit when she is married off to another man. He devotes his life to writing verses about his profound love for Layla, and although they attempt to meet, they die without ever realizing their relationship. The music for this highly anticipated collaboration between the Mark Morris Dance Group and the Silk Road Ensemble is by the Azerbaijani composer Uzeyir Hajibeyli and performed by the revered singer Alim Qasimov and his daughter, Fargana.

Co-presented with Michigan Opera Theatre.


Denis Matsuev, piano
2016-17 UMS
Denis Matsuev, piano
Since his triumph in 1998 at the 11th International Tchaikovsky Competition, the Siberian pianist Denis Matsuev has become a virtuoso in the grandest Russian pianist tradition. He has quickly established himself as one of the most prominent pianists of his generation. He returns for his fifth UMS appearance — but only his second recital — to launch the 138th Annual Choral Union Series.

Dorrance Dance
2016-17 UMS
Dorrance Dance
Former STOMP member and 2015 MacArthur “Genius” Grant awardee Michelle Dorrance honors tap dance’s uniquely beautiful history by pushing the form rhythmically, aesthetically, and conceptually. The innovative choreographer creates an imaginative world of sound, movement, and the forces that join them. Her UMS debut will feature an explosive show that blasts open our notions of tap with every stomp, stamp, and shuffle. “One of the most imaginative tap choreographers working today…” (The New Yorker)

Berlin Philharmonic
2016-17 UMS
Berlin Philharmonic
Returning to Hill Auditorium for the first time since 2009, the Berlin Philharmonic and music director Simon Rattle embark on their last tour together, bringing two concerts to Ann Arbor as part of an orchestral residency.

For the first program, they perform Pierre Boulez’ Éclat, a tribute to the late titan's death earlier this year, paired with Mahler’s seldom-performed Symphony No. 7.

The second program combines German Romanticism with early works from composers in the Second Viennese School to provide a fascinating exploration of Viennese musical evolution over the course of 40 years.

PROGRAM (SAT 11/12)
Boulez Éclat Mahler Symphony No. 7 in e minor



PROGRAM (SUN 11/13)
Schoenberg Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16
Webern Six Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 6
Berg Three Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 6
Brahms Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 73

Gabrieli: <i>A Venetian
Coronation 1595</i>
2016-17 UMS
Gabrieli: A Venetian Coronation 1595
Formerly known as the Gabrieli Consort & Players, Gabrieli is a pioneering ensemble whose innovative use of liturgy brings repertoire to life in the context of the ceremony for which it was composed. Founded by Paul McCreesh in 1982, Gabrieli performs its sumptuous reconstruction of a glorious 16th century Coronation Mass at St. Mark’s in Venice. The mass evokes the grand pageantry of what was truly a magnificent event: the coronation of the Venetian Doge Marino Grimani, whose love of ceremony and state festivals fueled an extraordinary musical bounty during his reign and gave rise to the musical riches of the period. Their recording of the work won the Gramphone Early Music Award in 2013 and is “a marvelous achievement, incorporating the rapturous choral polyphony of Andrea and Giovanni Gabrieli interspersed with passages of organ and period instrument arrangements of cornets, sackbuts, and shawms. It’s never less than enthralling…” (Independent)

Jake Shimabukuro, ukulele
2016-17 UMS
Jake Shimabukuro, ukulele
The ukulele is an adaptation of a stringed instrument that traveled with Portuguese immigrants who came to work in Hawaii’s sugarcane fields, and it's now synonymous with Hawaiian music and culture. Jake Shimabukuro comes from that same process of mixing both island and outside influences; he’s combined the qualities of a long line of virtuoso ukuele players with modern rock to create a sound that’s uniquely his own but still firmly grounded in Hawaiian tradition. Known for his lightning-fast fingers and innovative style, Shimabukuro saw his career skyrocket when his video of George Harrison’s While My Guitar Gently Weeps was posted on YouTube without his knowledge and became one of the first viral videos on the site. In addition to traditional ukulele material, his singular approach combines elements of jazz, blues, funk, rock, bluegrass, classical, swing, and flamenco.

Nora Chipaumire<br><i>portrait of myself as my <strike>father</strike></i>
2016-17 UMS
Nora Chipaumire
portrait of myself as my father
“Chipaumire has become a rock star of downtown dance, with a majestic quality that blows everything else out of the water.” (Dance Magazine) The Zimbabwean Choreographer Nora Chipaumire made her UMS debut as a member of Urban Bush Women in 2008 and now brings her latest work, portrait of myself as my father, to Ann Arbor.

The performance celebrates and critiques masculinity, manhood, and ideas around the “African male.”. The two performers — Senegalese dancer Kaolack joins Chipaumire — are tethered together in a makeshift boxing ring, battling their shadows and their ancestors and reflecting on what it is about the Black African male body that both intimidates and intrigues us.

UMS Choral Union<br />Handel's <i>Messiah</i>
2016-17 UMS
UMS Choral Union
Handel's Messiah
An eagerly anticipated holiday season tradition, these performances are ultimately the heart and soul of UMS, dating back to the organization’s founding and first concerts in the 1879-80 season. The performances connect audiences not only with the talented artists on stage, but also with the friends and family who attend each year. In a true community tradition, the performances feature the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra and the voices of the Grammy Award-winning UMS Choral Union, all under the direction of Choral Union music director Scott Hanoian. Soloists to be announced.

The King's Singers<br>Christmas Songbook
2016-17 UMS
The King's Singers
Christmas Songbook

Instantly recognizable for their immaculate intonation, vocal blend, diction, incisive timing, and delightfully British wit, they were one of the first groups that UMS President Ken Fischer presented, during an epic 1980s snowstorm in Washington, D.C., the group returns for Fischer’s final year before retiring with a special holiday program that includes works by Tchaikovsky, Lawson, and Pärt, as well as traditional seasonal songs drawn from the King’s Singers Christmas Songbook. “These six singers can do almost anything a full-sized chorus can do, with a degree of perfection that drops the jaw and delights the ear.” (Seattle Times)


Batsheva Dance Company<br><i>Last Work</i>
2016-17 UMS
Batsheva Dance Company
Last Work
UMS presents the North American premiere of Last Work, a new evening-length piece by Ohad Naharin performed by one of the world’s pre-eminent dance companies. Using the company’s famous Gaga technique, a movement language developed by Naharin, Last Work offers a political meditation on futility, shifting from sustained and meditative movement to frenzied, destabilizing bursts of energy that run through a huge range of emotion.

Igor and Moreno<br /><i>Idiot-Syncrasy</i>
2016-17 UMS
Igor and Moreno
Idiot-Syncrasy
The Urban Dictionary describes “idiotsyncracy” as “any method or procedure based in ritual or dogma that continues by force of momentum beyond the limits of common sense.” That’s certainly what’s in store when Igor and Moreno take the stage. Beginning by singing a Sardinian folk song, they proceed to bounce —literally— for the duration of the piece. Igor Urzelai and Moreno Solinas say that when they set out to create Idiot-Syncrasy they wanted to “change the world.” Recognizing that this would likely not be possible through a performance, they started jumping, singing, and testing different things that require perseverance, while exploring the immediacy of action as a vehicle for meaning, ideas, and desires. Direct from the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, the two London-based dancers take audiences on a unique journey of self-discovery, exploring both togetherness and solitude. “Idiot-Syncrasy feels very human. More than that: humane…I left feeling an expanded person.” (LondonDance)

Prague Philharmonic
2016-17 UMS
Prague Philharmonic

Founded just over 20 years ago, in 1994, the Prague Philharmonia demonstrates a tremendous love for the music it performs. Their sparkling passion makes every listener return home from its concerts full of joie de vivre. This all-Czech program features some of classical music’s most beloved scores.


Meredith Monk & Vocal Ensemble: <i>On Behalf of Nature</i>
2016-17 UMS
Meredith Monk & Vocal Ensemble: On Behalf of Nature

Drawing inspiration from writers and researchers who have sounded the alarm on the precarious state of our global ecosystem, Monk and her acclaimed Vocal Ensemble create a space where human, natural, and spiritual elements are woven into a delicate whole, illuminating the interconnection and interdependency of us all. “A rapturous new work…some of the finest music Monk has yet written.” (Los Angeles Times


Beethoven Quartet Cycle<br>
Tak&aacute;cs Quartet<br>
Concert 3
2016-17 UMS
Beethoven Quartet Cycle
Takács Quartet
Concert 3

“They are not for you, but for a later age!” So wrote Ludwig van Beethoven about his Op. 59 quartets, which will be performed in Ann Arbor this season as part of a complete Beethoven string quartet cycle by the Takács Quartet over six concerts in the 2016-17 season, joining only two other ensembles (the Budapest and Guarneri Quartets) to complete the cycle in a single season. Composed against the turbulent backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars and their aftermath, this radical music is as invigorating now as it was for its first performers and audiences. The first two and last two concerts are included in the 54th Chamber Arts Series; the middle two concerts are available as a subscriber add-on.

PROGRAM CONCERT 3

  • Quartet No. 5 in A Major, Op. 18, No. 5
  • Quartet No. 4 in c minor, Op. 18, No. 4
  • Quartet No. 15 in a minor, Op. 132

Beethoven Quartet Cycle<br />
Tak&aacute;cs Quartet<br />
Concert 4
2016-17 UMS
Beethoven Quartet Cycle
Takács Quartet
Concert 4

“They are not for you, but for a later age!” So wrote Ludwig van Beethoven about his Op. 59 quartets, which will be performed in Ann Arbor this season as part of a complete Beethoven string quartet cycle by the Takács Quartet over six concerts in the 2016-17 season, joining only two other ensembles (the Budapest and Guarneri Quartets) to complete the cycle in a single season. Composed against the turbulent backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars and their aftermath, this radical music is as invigorating now as it was for its first performers and audiences. The first two and last two concerts are included in the 54th Chamber Arts Series; the middle two concerts are available as a subscriber add-on.

PROGRAM CONCERT 4

  • Quartet No. 3 in D Major, Op. 18, No. 3
  • Quartet No. 8 in e minor, Op. 59, No. 2
  • Quartet No. 12 in E-flat Major, Op. 127

Barnatan, McGill & Weilerstein
2016-17 UMS
Barnatan, McGill & Weilerstein
This powerhouse trio brings together some familiar faces. Inon Barnatan was the featured piano soloist with the New York Philharmonic last fall, Anthony McGill is the New York Philharmonic’s principal clarinetist, and Alisa Weilersten has performed on both the Choral Union Series and the Chamber Arts Series in recent years. This concert of beloved clarinet trios includes a new work by Joseph Hallman, a prolific young composer based in Philadelphia, which was co-commissioned by UMS as part of the Music Accord commissioning consortium.

Bruckner Orchestra Linz
2016-17 UMS
Bruckner Orchestra Linz
This unlikely mashup features an Austrian orchestra performing works by composers who wrote about the experience of Africans and African-Americans. The program includes Alexander Zemlinsky’s Africa Sings, which was written in 1929 and features poetry by Langston Hughes and other prominent writers from the Harlem Renaissance. The program also features Phillip Glass’s recent collaboration with the Beninese singer Angélique Kidjo based on three poems of Ifé, one of the most important Yorùbán kingdoms.

Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir
2016-17 UMS
Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir
When the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir landed in New York for its first North American tour in 1995 (including a stop in Ann Arbor for UMS’s very first concert at St. Francis), they were known only as the performers on the best-selling CD of fellow-Estonian Arvo Pärt’s austere Te Deum. The concerts showed much more — a virtuosic ensemble that could dazzle in everything from Bach to folk songs. Now they return with newly-named artistic director Kaspars Putninš with music by Pärt, Schnittke, Ligeti, Brahms, and Tormis. “So wondrously talented…the selections and performances were so fine that they left you feeling like an ingrate, greedily hungry for more.” (New York Times)

Calidore String Quartet<br />M-Prize Winner!
2016-17 UMS
Calidore String Quartet
M-Prize Winner!

Budapest Festival Orchestra
2016-17 UMS
Budapest Festival Orchestra
Pianist Richard Goode joins the Budapest Festival Orchestra for this all-Beethoven program, which also features the UMS Choral Union in a performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. The BFO was co-founded by the charismatic conductor Iván Fischer in 1983, and their past performances in Hill Auditorium have left audiences mesmerized.

<i>Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity</i><br />Ping Chong + Company
2016-17 UMS
Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity
Ping Chong + Company

Ping Chong + Company creates theater that crosses boundaries of identity, community, and form.

His projects have explored a wide variety of subject matter, from a hidden genocide in Africa to class struggles in America and modernization in China, but the common thread is a unifying commitment to artistic innovation and social responsibility.

This interview-based theater production, part of Chong’s 25-year series entitled Undesirable Elements, explores the diverse experiences of young Muslim New Yorkers. The five participants in Beyond Sacred share the common experience of coming of age in a post-9/11 New York City, at a time of increasing Islamophobia. Participants come from a range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds and include young men and women who reflect a range of Muslim identities, including those who converted to Islam, those who were raised Muslim but have since left the faith, those who identify as “secular” or “culturally” Muslim, and those who are observant on a daily basis.


Aaron Diehl and Cecile McLorin Salvant:<br><i> Jelly and George</i>
2016-17 UMS
Aaron Diehl and Cecile McLorin Salvant:
Jelly and George
Timeless classics are elevated by modern masters when gifted jazz pianist and arranger Aaron Diehl and 26-year-old vocalist extraordinaire Cécile McLorin Salvant join forces to revisit and revitalize the works of George Gershwin and Jelly Roll Morton. Combining lesser-known pieces with new arrangements, this project celebrates the past while tracing a musical lineage that spans a century. Aaron Diehl, a leading force in today’s generation of jazz contemporaries, was the 2014 Monterey Jazz Festival Commission Artist and spearheads a distinct union of traditional and fresh artistry. McLorin Salvant, though practically unknown to any of the judges or participants, walked away with first place at the 2010 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Vocals Competition, and the buzz began immediately. A 2016 Grammy winner (“Best Jazz Vocal Album”), she frequently draws comparisons to the Big Three — Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan, and Ella Fitzgerald — able to bend notes to her will and get inside each song the way an actress inhabits a starring role.

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra<br />with Wynton Marsalis
2016-17 UMS
Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra
with Wynton Marsalis
"The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis is so far from the usual big-band cliché that it's mind-blowing." (Dallas) Since 1988, Marsalis has led the 15-piece Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, which simultaneously honors the rich heritage of Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong while presenting a stunning variety of new works from illustrious names, many of whom perform regularly with the ensemble. From swinging to supple, it's all sheer jazz perfection -- and no wonder these annual appearances have become a favorite of UMS audiences. "You know it's a good gig when you can't tell if the band or the audience is having more fun." (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel)

Druid: <i>Beauty Queen of Leenane</i>
2016-17 UMS
Druid: Beauty Queen of Leenane
Druid, which made its acclaimed UMS debut in 2011 with The Cripple of Inishmaan, returns with a new production of Martin McDonagh’s dark comedy The Beauty Queen of Leenane. As tragically funny as it is horrific, this brilliantly subversive play takes place in an economically depressed Irish village in the early 1990s, with a vicious and relentless war of wills between a manipulative, aging mother, Mag, and her plain and lonely 40-year-old daughter, Maureen. After years of caring for her ungrateful mother, Maureen has little hope of happiness or escape, especially after Mag ruins her first, and perhaps only, chance of a loving relationship. This is confrontational theater at its most potent, with characters locked in mortal combat and mutual loathing.

UMS Choral Union<br />Beethoven: <i>Missa Solemnis</i>
2016-17 UMS
UMS Choral Union
Beethoven: Missa Solemnis

Beethoven spent more time writing his massive Missa Solemnis than any other work he composed. Written to honor Rudolph, the Archduke of Austria, who was Beethoven’s foremost patron and was to be invested as Archbishop in March 1820, the mass is eclipsed by the better-known Ninth Symphony, which premiered around the same time (and which will be performed on a UMS concert by the Budapest Festival Orchestra a month earlier).

Missa Solemnis has been performed only four times in all of UMS’s history: at three May Festivals (with the Chicago Symphony in 1927 and the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1947 and 1955), and most recently by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra in 1977. The UMS Choral Union and Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Scott Hanoian, bring this monumental work to UMS audiences for the first time in 40 years.

Soloists to be announced.


Snarky Puppy
2016-17 UMS
Snarky Puppy

This once Texan, now New York-based quasi-collective has gone from a best-kept secret to one of the biggest bands on the international scene. Although still “underground” in many respects, the band followed up its first Grammy in 2014 (“Best R&B Performance”) with its second this past February for “Best Contemporary Instrumental Album.” They have earned high praise from critical stalwarts like the BBC, Village Voice, The Guardian, and the New York Times, as well as from the world’s most respected musicians, from Pat Metheny to Prince. Formed in 2004 at the acclaimed music school of the University of North Texas, the group was voted “Best Jazz Group” in Downbeat’s 2015 Reader’s Poll as well as “Best New Artist” in JazzTimes’s 2014 Reader’s Poll. Their music is a mixture of funk, jazz, gospel, rock, and R&B that strikes a perfect balance between pure musical virtuosity and raw soulful simplicity.


Kidd Pivot and Electric Company Theater<br /><i>Betroffenheit</i>
2016-17 UMS
Kidd Pivot and Electric Company Theater
Betroffenheit
Created by
Crystal Pite, director and choreographer
and Jonathan Young, writer



Some questions are impossible to answer and some experiences too personal to express. Crystal Pite, the choreographer who brought The Tempest Replica to Ann Arbor four seasons ago, is back with her 2015 work for Kidd Pivot and Electric Company Theatre: Betroffenheit, which means a sort of shock, speechlessness, and bewilderment.

This searing work has its roots in a deeply personal tragedy: the deaths of writer Jonathan Young's teenage daughter and two cousins in a fire. With unflinching honesty, it achieves broad resonance as it touches on themes of loss, trauma, addiction, and recovery through a boundary-stretching hybrid of theater and dance. "A stunning testament to what can happen when life turns into art." (The Globe and Mail)

Steve Reich &#64; 80: <i>Music for 18 Musicians</i>
2016-17 UMS
Steve Reich @ 80: Music for 18 Musicians
The Guardian in London asserts, “There’s just a handful of living composers who can legitimately claim to have altered the direction of musical history, and Steve Reich is one of them.” Reich, who has been called “our greatest living composer” (New York Times), celebrates his 80th birthday in 2016, and the year also marks the 40th anniversary of the premiere of Music for 18 Musicians, considered by many to be his greatest composition. Two of Chicago’s world-class ensembles, eighth blackbird and Third Coast Percussion, team up to perform this seminal composition.

Mitsuko Uchida, piano
2016-17 UMS
Mitsuko Uchida, piano

Renowned for her interpretations of Mozart and Schumann, the legendary pianist Mitsuko Uchida has also illuminated the music of new composers. She will perform the US premiere of a new work by the German composer Jürg Widmann in her first UMS concert since her 1998 debut.


Beethoven Quartet Cycle<br />
Tak&aacute;cs Quartet<br />
Concert 5
2016-17 UMS
Beethoven Quartet Cycle
Takács Quartet
Concert 5

“They are not for you, but for a later age!” So wrote Ludwig van Beethoven about his Op. 59 quartets, which will be performed in Ann Arbor this season as part of a complete Beethoven string quartet cycle by the Takács Quartet over six concerts in the 2016-17 season, joining only two other ensembles (the Budapest and Guarneri Quartets) to complete the cycle in a single season. Composed against the turbulent backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars and their aftermath, this radical music is as invigorating now as it was for its first performers and audiences. The first two and last two concerts are included in the 54th Chamber Arts Series; the middle two concerts are available as a subscriber add-on.

PROGRAM CONCERT 5

  • Quartet No. 6 in B-flat Major, Op. 18, No. 6
  • Quartet No. 16 in F Major, Op. 135
  • Quartet No. 9 in C Major, Op. 59, No. 3

Beethoven Quartet Cycle<br />
Tak&aacute;cs Quartet<br />
Concert 6
2016-17 UMS
Beethoven Quartet Cycle
Takács Quartet
Concert 6

“They are not for you, but for a later age!” So wrote Ludwig van Beethoven about his Op. 59 quartets, which will be performed in Ann Arbor this season as part of a complete Beethoven string quartet cycle by the Takács Quartet over six concerts in the 2016-17 season, joining only two other ensembles (the Budapest and Guarneri Quartets) to complete the cycle in a single season. Composed against the turbulent backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars and their aftermath, this radical music is as invigorating now as it was for its first performers and audiences. The first two and last two concerts are included in the 54th Chamber Arts Series; the middle two concerts are available as a subscriber add-on.

PROGRAM CONCERT 6

  • Quartet No. 7 in F Major, Op. 59, No. 1
  • Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 with Op. 133 “Grosse Fuge”

DakhaBrakha
2016-17 UMS
DakhaBrakha
Drones and beats, crimson beads, and towering black lambswool hats all serve as a striking backdrop for an unexpected, refreshingly novel vision of Eastern European roots music. This hit Ukrainian folk-punk quartet stirs up a mesmerizing sound that melds traditional Ukrainian folk music, African grooves, Eastern colors, and a contemporary, trans-national sensibility that the band calls “ethno-chaos.”

With one foot in the urban avant-garde and the other in Ukrainian village culture, DakhaBrakha made NPR music host Bob Boilen’s “Top 10 Events of 2015” — no small feat given the 506 concerts he attended that year. Rolling Stone’s report on their Bonnaroo appearance was equally enthusiastic: “Ukrainian folkdrone Björkpunk quartet DakhaBrakha ended up with one of the most receptive crowds of the weekend…turning the tent into a happy menagerie.”

Complicite: <i>The Encounter</i>
2016-17 UMS
Complicite: The Encounter
In 1969,National Geographic photographer Loren McIntyre became hopelessly lost in a remote part of the Brazilian rainforest while searching for the Mayoruna people.

His encounter tested his perception of the world, bringing the limits of human consciousness into startling focus. Threading scenes of his own life with details of McIntyre's journey, Complicité artistic director Simon McBurney incorporates objects and sound effects into this solo performance to evoke a rainforest landscape. Transmitted directly to the audience through provided headphones, the show’s groundbreaking technology and sound design plugs into the power of the imagination, questioning our perceptions of time, communication, and our own consciousness. McBurney transports us into the humid depths of the Amazon, its intense soundscape a new approach to site-specific theater.

Michael Fabiano, tenor<br />
Martin Katz, piano
2016-17 UMS
Michael Fabiano, tenor
Martin Katz, piano

A University of Michigan alumnus, Michael Fabiano received the 2014 Richard Tucker Award and the 2014 Beverly Sills Artist Award, the first-ever winner of both awards in the same year. "A marvel… Fabiano’s sound was so beautiful, and the transition from the bottom to the top of his range so seamless as to proclaim him ‘the’ tenor that we have all been waiting for." (San Francisco Classical Voice)


A Far Cry with Roomful of Teeth
2016-17 UMS
A Far Cry with Roomful of Teeth
A Far Cry stands at the forefront of an exciting new generation in classical music. The 17-member, selfconducted chamber music collective joins forces with virtuosic vocalists Roomful of Teeth to create a sonic patchwork that is ever-changing with its fleeting burst of colors, timbres, and visions. The program opens with the lush writing of Caroline Shaw (2013 Pulitzer Prize winner), with the second half devoted to two raw, energetic, and captivating works by Ted Hearne.

PROGRAM
  • Shaw Music in Common Time
  • Prokofiev Visions Fugitives
  • Hearne New Work
  • Hearne Law of Mosai

Sanam Marvi
2016-17 UMS
Sanam Marvi

With compelling interpretations that draw deeply from one of the world’s great music traditions, Sanam Marvi is Pakistan’s next inspiring diviner of South Asia’s Sufi texts. A vocal warrior for tolerance and peace, this contemporary daughter of the Sindh province is a brilliant interpreter of South Asia’s spiritual, folk, and classical poetry. Her performances balance immediacy and elegant ornamentation, lending new light to her well-loved repertoire of sufi, ghazal, qawwali, and folk songs. An in-demand performer too rarely heard outside émigré circles, she makes her first extended tour to the US.


King Sunny Ade
2016-17 UMS
King Sunny Ade
Since the evolution of jùjú music in Nigeria in the 1930s, no one has made a more lasting impact in the genre than King Sunny Adé. As a singer, composer, and guitarist, this pioneer of modern world music has succeeded in taking Nigerian social music to international heights. Adé formed his first band in 1967 and has been in the limelight in Nigeria ever since. Singing in his native Yorùbá language, Adé went on to define the terms "Afropop" and "World Beat" and to open the door to the West for other African musicians. King Sunny Adé & His African Beats last toured North America in 2005. He will lay down his trademark mix of talking drum-driven grooves, multi-guitar weaves, lilting vocal harmonies, and pedal steel guitar accents, taking the audiences on an intoxicating journey.

Yo-Yo Ma, Edgar Meyer & Chris Thile
2016-17 UMS
Yo-Yo Ma, Edgar Meyer & Chris Thile

This special concert at the end of UMS’s season brings together three artists who have been collaborating for the better part of a decade, most notably on the bestselling recording The Goat Rodeo Sessions.

YoYo Ma’s multi-faceted career is a testament to his continual search for new ways to communicate with audiences and to his personal desire for artistic growth and renewal. Here, he is joined by mandolinist Chris Thile (Punch Brothers, Nickel Creek) and bass virtuoso Edgar Meyer for a special concert that brings together three string virtuosos who come from wildly different backgrounds yet excel in virtually all genres.

They pool their talents for a fresh, new perspective on the brilliantly conceived music by the titan of the German Baroque, Johann Sebastian Bach. The Program includes transcriptions of excerpts from The Art of the Fugue and various keyboard works, as well as organ and viola da gamba trio sonatas. This concert is currently available only to subscribers; remaining tickets go on sale on August 15, 2016.


Opera in Concert<br />
Handel’s <i>Ariodante</i>
2016-17 UMS
Opera in Concert
Handel’s Ariodante
Contemporary opera composer Jake Heggie enthused in Gramophone magazine, “The staggering, joyful artistry of Joyce DiDonato reminds us that in any generation there are a few giants…Those who know her repertoire are in awe of her gifts, and those who know nothing of it are instantly engaged.”DiDonato enchants audiences across the globe with her 24-carat voice and performances that “leave one bereft of superlatives.” (The Telegraph) This concert opera with The English Concert and conductor Harry Bicket will be performed in only two places in the country: Hill Auditorium and Carnegie Hall.